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Mercury’s bizzare magnetic field tells scientists how its interior is different from Earth’s

Mercury's interior is different from the Earth's interior in a way that explains Mercury's bizarre magnetic field, planetary physicists report. Measurements from NASA's Messenger spacecraft have revealed that Mercury's magnetic field is approximately three times stronger at its northern hemisphere than its southern one.
 
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Posted by on July 30, 2014 in Blog

 

Scientists caution against exploitation of deep ocean

The world's oceans are vast and deep, yet rapidly advancing technology and the quest for extracting resources from previously unreachable depths is beginning to put the deep seas on the cusp of peril, an international team of scientists has warned.
 
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Posted by on July 30, 2014 in Blog

 

Climate extremes are here to stay: Expect more heat waves and cold snaps

Researchers show how they've used advanced computational data science tools to demonstrate that despite global warming, we may still experience severe cold snaps due to increasing variability in temperature extremes.
 
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Posted by on July 30, 2014 in Blog

 

Spin-based electronics: New material successfully tested

Spintronics is a new field of electronics, using electron spin rather than motion. This technology requires insulating components that can control this quantum property. Scientists have shown experimentally that a novel material shows all the required properties.
 
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Posted by on July 30, 2014 in Blog

 

Ice age lion figurine: Ancient fragment of ivory belonging to 40,000 year old animal figurine unearthed

Archaeologists have found an ancient fragment of ivory belonging to a 40,000 year old animal figurine. Both pieces were found in the Vogelherd Cave in southwestern Germany, which has yielded a number of remarkable works of art dating to the Ice Age. The mammoth ivory figurine depicting a lion was discovered during excavations in 1931. The new fragment makes up one side of the figurine’s head.
 
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Posted by on July 30, 2014 in Blog

 

Antarctic icebergs: A significant natural ocean sound source in the Southern Hemisphere

Abstract

In late 2007, two massive icebergs, C19a and B15a, drifted into open water and slowly disintegrated in the southernmost Pacific Ocean. Archived acoustic records show that the high-intensity underwater sounds accompanying this breakup increased ocean noise levels at mid-to-equatorial latitudes over a period of ˜1.5 years. More typically, seasonal variations in ocean noise, which are characterized by austral summer-highs and winter-lows, appear to be modulated by the annual cycle of Antarctic iceberg drift and subsequent disintegration. This seasonal pattern is observed in all three Oceans of the Southern Hemisphere. The life cycle of Antarctic icebergs affects not only marine ecosystem but also the sound environment in far-reaching areas and must be accounted for in any effort to isolate anthropogenic or climate-induced noise contributions to the ocean soundscape.

 
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Posted by on July 30, 2014 in Blog

 

Weighing the Milky Way: Researchers devise precise method for calculating the mass of galaxies

Does the Milky Way look fat in this picture? Has Andromeda been taking skinny selfies? Using a new, more accurate method for measuring the mass of galaxies, and international group of researchers has shown that the Milky Way has half the Mass of the Andromeda Galaxy.
 
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Posted by on July 30, 2014 in Blog

 

Prehistoric dairy farming at the extremes

Finland's love of milk has been traced back to 2500 BC, thanks to high-tech techniques to analyze residues preserved in fragments of ancient pots.
 
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Posted by on July 30, 2014 in Blog

 

Underwater elephants: Mixed impacts of the world’s largest — and threatened — parrotfish

Scientists recently got back to basics in order to discover the positive and negative effects that bumphead parrotfish exert on coral reef ecosystems. Using direct observation, animal tracking and computer simulation, the researchers sought to understand whether the world's largest parrotfish is necessary for positively shaping the structure and functioning of ecosystems. The answer is yes and no.
 
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Posted by on July 29, 2014 in Blog

 

Huge waves measured for first time in Arctic Ocean

The first measurements of waves in the middle of the Arctic Ocean recorded house-sized waves during a September 2012 storm. More sensors are going out this summer to study waves in newly ice-free Arctic waters.
 
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Posted by on July 29, 2014 in Blog